The recent upswing in NG prices has been an incredible trade for many, yet we believe a top is now forming in Natural Gas that could catch many traders by surprise.  The recent upside gap in price and upward price volatility would normally not concern long traders.  They would likely view this as a tremendous success for their long NG positions, yet we believe this move is about to come to a dramatic end – fairly quickly.
The moving average is a line that plots the average price of a stock over a set period of time. A basic trading method is to buy when share prices rise above the long-term moving average and sell when the price falls below. In the paper, Technical Analysis with a Long Term Perspective: Trading Strategies and Market Timing Ability, some uncommon approaches were evaluated. One strategy was to analyze the trailing four years of market data to determine which moving average length proved the most effective for making investment decisions. Contrary to the usual calculation of moving averages using periods as short as 50 or 200 days, the moving averages in this paper were calculated over much longer periods of time.

Wheat: Wheat grows on six continents and for centuries has been one of the most important food crops in the world. Traders compare wheat prices to other grains such as corn, oats and barley. Since these commodities can be substituted for one another, changes in their relative prices can shift demand between them and other products such as soybeans. Demand for cheap and nutritious food sources in developing nations should continue to drive interest in the wheat market.


People rolled their eyes when I told them I was following a newsletter to try to time the real estate market. I think my attempts to evangelize the logic of Campbell's timing system fell on deaf ears. But the proof was in the pudding, and I think that last housing boom-bust cycle (rising through 2006, then falling for about 4 years, and then rising for most of the last 5 years) made believers out of many of the skeptics.
And the longer the time frame — through highs and lows — the greater the chances of a positive outcome. Indeed, over the past 90 years, through December 31, 2017, 94% of 10-year periods have been positive ones. Investors who have stayed in the market through occasional (and inevitable) periods of declining stock prices historically have been rewarded for their long-term outlook.
As other reviewers have already outlined in the comments below, this book tells you which five statistics to pay attention to (direction of interest rates, direction of defaults, direction of foreclosures, direction of builder sentiment, etc.). You can track this information in a spreadsheet yourself, but it would be very cumbersome to do this. The author (correctly) assumes that it would be much easier for most of us to have someone else track these numbers each month, and sell us the refined data. And that's where his timing newsletter comes in. His newsletter costs about $135 a year, which sounds like a lot, but even if you have to fork out that amount for 5 years, that's peanuts compared to the losses you would incur by buying the average home (or an investment property) at the wrong time, like back in 2007, when the CA housing market had just started its 50% crash. You could have easily lost $300K by getting in too early, or getting out too late. And the information isn't clinically precise (and I think Campbell himself says it's only correct 80% of the time, which means it's wrong the other 20%, which would suck if you acted on the buy/sell signals during the times it was wrong.) But still, 80% accuracy is a good batting average.
THERE ARE ALSO LOTS OF TIPS PROVIDING COMPANY WHICH WILL CHARGE CERTAIN FEES AND PROVIDE YOU TRADING TIPS/ADVICE. SOME OF THEM DEMAND THEMSELVES MARKET RESEARCHER AND ANALYSER, INVESTMENT ADVISER. MOST OF THE BROKERS AND TIPS PROVIDING COMPANY’S TIPS/ADVICE ARE MORE LOSS MAKING THAN PROFIT MAKING. GETTING TRAPPED BY THEM , YOU LOSE SOME PROPORTION OF YOUR GOOD MONEY.

As other reviewers have already outlined in the comments below, this book tells you which five statistics to pay attention to (direction of interest rates, direction of defaults, direction of foreclosures, direction of builder sentiment, etc.). You can track this information in a spreadsheet yourself, but it would be very cumbersome to do this. The author (correctly) assumes that it would be much easier for most of us to have someone else track these numbers each month, and sell us the refined data. And that's where his timing newsletter comes in. His newsletter costs about $135 a year, which sounds like a lot, but even if you have to fork out that amount for 5 years, that's peanuts compared to the losses you would incur by buying the average home (or an investment property) at the wrong time, like back in 2007, when the CA housing market had just started its 50% crash. You could have easily lost $300K by getting in too early, or getting out too late. And the information isn't clinically precise (and I think Campbell himself says it's only correct 80% of the time, which means it's wrong the other 20%, which would suck if you acted on the buy/sell signals during the times it was wrong.) But still, 80% accuracy is a good batting average.


Agricultural: This category includes food crops (e.g., corn, cotton and soybeans), livestock (e.g., cattle, hogs and pork bellies) and industrial crops (e.g., lumber, rubber and wool). In India, NCDEX that is National Commodity and Derivative Exchange is the platform for the traders in Agri. MCX have those but the volume is much-much higher in that.
"Since getting your full service with intra-day updates in the last year, I better understand what goes into just how difficult your job is and how comprehensive your "guys" and you actually are. I continue to use your service for different decision making processes but in the end has been a growing benefit to our business. I've ALSO gotten smarter in how to use your "stuff". *
Fast-growing countries such as India and China are accumulating vast amounts of wealth as their economies grow. As a result, they have a growing need for a variety of basic goods and raw materials such as crops and livestock to feed their people, metals to build the infrastructure in their cities and energy to fuel their factories, homes and farms. Demand from emerging markets has a huge impact on commodity prices. Signs of economic slowdown in these countries can depress prices, while surging economic growth can cause commodity prices to rise.
Daylight Savings Time (DST) is generally applicable in autumn and spring; however, it is not equally applicable to all instruments. There will be instruments that apply DST to USA times, with the EU or APAC times, while others may not apply DST at all. Our trading times are updated in the table below to reflect these changes as accurately as possible.
WTI hit a low point at $56 per barrel on Wednesday and Brent hit a low just below $65 per barrel. Both crude benchmarks regained some ground at the end of the week, despite the huge increase in U.S. crude oil inventories. In fact, rising prices in the face of the 10-million-barrel increase in crude stocks suggests that oil may have already hit a bottom. “[Y]esterday’s price reaction to the US inventory data shows that negative news is now largely priced in,” Commerzbank said in a note. “This is the only way to explain why an increase in US crude oil stocks of a good 10 million barrels failed to put further pressure on prices.”
Following two years without so much as a whisper of volatility, the iconic Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES:^DJI) and broad-based S&P 500 (SNPINDEX:^GSPC) are seemingly doing their best to keep investors on the edge of their seats. In February, the CBOE Volatility Index briefly hit a nine-year high following three grim single-day performances over a span of six days that saw the Dow lose 666 points, 1,033 points, and 1,175 points, its biggest single-day decline in history.

Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.

Copper: Copper has so many industrial uses that it would be virtually impossible to build the infrastructure of a country without it. Traders often refer to the commodity as Dr. Copper. They say the metal has a Ph.D. in economics because its price is a reliable barometer of the overall health of the global economy. In fact, investing in copper is a way to express a bullish view on world GDP.
Extended Hours Trading allows investors to act quickly on information that comes out when markets are officially closed. In the past, only large institutional investors could participate in Extended Hours Trading. Thanks to the emergence of private trading systems in recent years, individual investors are now able to trade during extended hours as well.
×