When I was writing technical analysis reports for the customers of a major global bank, I received some interesting feedback from one of the bank's relationship managers. The customers liked the reports, she said, but it would be good if I made them less "technical." Making technical analysis reports less technical, hmmm. (To be fair, it is actually good advice because striking a balance between technical details and readability is an art.) Sometimes, though, an explanation of a concept cannot help but delve into some detail. So please bear with me on this one.
Daylight Savings Time (DST) is generally applicable in autumn and spring; however, it is not equally applicable to all instruments. There will be instruments that apply DST to USA times, with the EU or APAC times, while others may not apply DST at all. Our trading times are updated in the table below to reflect these changes as accurately as possible.
Since there are a glut of fundamental and technical indicators available – many of which conflict – which do you follow? In other words, how do you react when the employment rate is dropping, but stocks rise to new highs on increased earnings? Should you buy when stocks are well below historical price-to-earnings ratios despite high volume selling? For every report and survey suggesting one direction, there is usually a contradicting indicator that suggests the opposite.

In the 1800s, the burgeoning grain trade led to the establishment of commodities forward contract markets in the United States. Farmers in the Midwest would bring their crops to Chicago for storage prior to shipment to the East Coast. However, during storage, the prices for these grains might change for a variety of reasons. The quality of the stored item could deteriorate, for example, or demand for the item could increase or decrease.

Short Interest is the number of shares currently borrowed by short sellers for sale, but not yet returned to the owner (lender). Every short seller anticipates a declining stock market. A profit is made if the stock is bought back at a lower price than when it was sold short. When a large amount of short selling activity is occurring, market participants obviously expect prices to head lower. Short sellers are potential buyers sooner or later and represent a lot of buying power when they have to scramble for cover in a sudden market turn.


What separates commodities from other types of goods is that they are standardized and interchangeable with other goods of the same type. These features make commodities fungible. This means that two equivalent units of the same commodity should have mostly uniform prices any place in the world (* excluding local factors such as the cost of transportation and taxes).

We emphasized it many times and we will continue to do so, as it’s very easy to forget about it when things get volatile on a day-to-day basis. The long-term signals are far more important than the short-term ones. In a fight, it’s not always the bigger guy (or gal) that has the advantage, but in certain circumstances it’s obvious that weight matters (please keep this picture in mind while reading about the possible counter-trend upswing in the short run – that’s the little guy while the big guy are the powerful long-term factors). That’s exactly the case with the weight and importance of long-term signals when comparing them to the short-term ones. Surely, we could get a 1-2% upswing, but so what, if a 15% decline is just around the corner? And in particular, if it could take place right away?
Although many traders consider themselves either fundamental or technical traders, this distinction need not hold in every case. The very best traders incorporate elements of both forms of analysis in their trading. For example, a trader may see production figures for gold dwindling. At the same time, the trader notices that the CCI indicates that gold is oversold. The confluence of these two indicators may be a perfect signal to buy gold.
Page << | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 10 | 20 | 30 | 40 | 50 | 60 | 70 | 80 | 90 | 100 | 110 | 120 | 130 | 140 | 150 | 160 | 170 | 180 | 190 | 200 | 210 | 220 | 230 | 240 | 250 | 260 | 270 | 280 | 290 | 300 | 310 | 320 | 330 | 340 | 350 | 360 | 370 | 380 | 390 | 400 | 410 | 420 | 430 | 440 | 450 | 460 | 470 | 480 | 490 | 500 | 510 | 520 | 530 | 540 | 550 | 560 | 570 | 580 | 590 | 600 | 610 | 620 | 630 | 640 | 650 | 660 | 670 | 680 | 690 | 700 | 710 | 720 | 730 | 740 | 750 | 760 | 770 | 780 | 790 | 800 | 810 | 820 | 830 | 840 | 850 | 860 | 870 | 880 | >>
Robert Campbell has produced a unique work in the area of real estate books. While there are a lot of books that concentrate on purchasing in the right location and at the right price, this is the first one that points out the right location is of no help if the real estate market is in a downturn. "Timing the Real Estate Market" looks at the real estate market in a perspective similar to stocks, bonds and other investment vehicles. From this perspective there are cycles where prices rise and fall. The author examines not only the cycles of the past but the indicators that preceded each event. Using these "vital signs" he walks you through case studies on how to determine when to buy and when to sell. Finally, Robert Campbell discusses the ten cardinal rules of the system so that you can't go wrong. If you are planning to invest in real estate you owe it to yourself to purchase this book so you understand the trends and how they affect real estate ups and downs. After you have read this book and understand when the market is in an upswing, get one of the other books that discuss location and other important factors so you can get added return by buying the right piece of property.

Are the metals markets ending a price correction in unison and preparing for a massive price advance?  This is the question we asked our research team to investigate and their findings may help skilled traders identify great opportunities in the future.  This multi-part research article will share our most recent opinion about the metals markets as well as share some critical new data that can shed some light into what we believe will become a massive upside price rally in the metals markets. Let’s get into the data.
Your access to The Wall Street Journal online is subject to you not being an existing user of The Wall Street Journal online. Existing users include current or past Premium Users of The Wall Street Journal online. If you happen to be one, your subscription will be valid for Business Standard Digital only without any change in the subscription price.
×