Short Interest is the number of shares currently borrowed by short sellers for sale, but not yet returned to the owner (lender). Every short seller anticipates a declining stock market. A profit is made if the stock is bought back at a lower price than when it was sold short. When a large amount of short selling activity is occurring, market participants obviously expect prices to head lower. Short sellers are potential buyers sooner or later and represent a lot of buying power when they have to scramble for cover in a sudden market turn. 

MCX stands for Multi Commodity Exchange of India Limited and is headquartered at Mumbai. It is state-of-the-art electronic commodity futures exchange. The demutualised Exchange is set up by Financial Technologies (India) Ltd (FTIL) and it has permanent recognition from the Government of India to facilitate online trading, and clearing and settlement operations for commodity futures across the country. It started its operations in November 2003 and now it has a market share of over 80% of the Indian commodity futures market, and has more than 2000 registered members operating through over 100,000 trader work stations, across India. It is pertinent to note that Exchange has also emerged as the sixth largest and amongst the fastest growing commodity futures exchange in the world, in terms of the number of contracts traded in 2009.
Robert Campbell has produced a unique work in the area of real estate books. While there are a lot of books that concentrate on purchasing in the right location and at the right price, this is the first one that points out the right location is of no help if the real estate market is in a downturn. "Timing the Real Estate Market" looks at the real estate market in a perspective similar to stocks, bonds and other investment vehicles. From this perspective there are cycles where prices rise and fall. The author examines not only the cycles of the past but the indicators that preceded each event. Using these "vital signs" he walks you through case studies on how to determine when to buy and when to sell. Finally, Robert Campbell discusses the ten cardinal rules of the system so that you can't go wrong. If you are planning to invest in real estate you owe it to yourself to purchase this book so you understand the trends and how they affect real estate ups and downs. After you have read this book and understand when the market is in an upswing, get one of the other books that discuss location and other important factors so you can get added return by buying the right piece of property.
There is much debate on market efficiency i.e. how well and how fast the markets incorporate information about future profits. It is of note that on certain occasions the market can appear relatively random. One example is the October 1987 market crash (Black Monday) where the international stock markets, including the US, fell 20% or more in a single day. Subsequent analysis by Robert Shiller, the Nobel Prize winning economist, based on surveying investors suggested that the decline was due to investor psychology and did not have an obvious external cause. If true, this creates a substantial challenge for market timing because such ephemeral causes can be extremely hard to predict and forecast. It is one thing to forecast and predict something that is rational, but quite another to predict something that may, at times, hinge on the whims of human psychology.
The above three sessions represent the stock market timing of stock exchanges in India. However, one special trading session happens not during the trading hours. It takes place during the festival of Diwali. The trading session is termed as “Mahurat Trading”. The date and time are declared few days before Diwali. In fact, the trading session begins in the evening and lasts for one hour. The timing of the session, in general, is 6.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. The pre-open session is from 6.15 p.m. to 6.30 p.m.
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Have you heard about the Everything Bubble? Some analysts believe that after the dot-com bubble of the 1990s and the housing bubble of the 2000s, we are in the middle of a price bubble in virtually all asset classes simultaneously caused by the Fed’s unusually easy monetary policy with ultra low interest rates. Although we agree that the US central bank maintained federal funds rate too low for too long, the narrative about a dangerous bubble inflating in a wide variety of countries, industries, and assets does not make sense. The bubble means that the price of an asset deviates from the fundamental value, increasing excessively, to a much greater extent than on other markets. It should be now clear that the existence of overvalued assets necessarily means that other assets are undervalued, so there can’t be the ‘everything bubble’. Sorry, but those who wait for the total asset apocalypse might be disappointed.
Valeriy Zakamulin is Professor of Finance at the School of Business and Law, University of Agder, Norway. He has an M.S. in Business Administration and a PhD in Finance from the Norwegian School of Economics, Norway. He has published articles for various refereed academic and practitioner journals and is a frequent speaker at international conferences. He has also served on the Editorial Board of the Open Economics Journal, Journal of Banking and Finance, and International Journal of Emerging Markets. His current research interests cover behavioral finance, portfolio optimization, time-series analysis of financial data, and stock return and risk predictability.
Markets are deceptive…but we all know that.  Beyond deceptive, markets are actually down right diabolical.  Mr. Market operates through his two most trustworthy lieutenants Mr. Bull and Mr. Bear.  He has tasked Mr. Bull to climb and reach the top of the mountain using investors buying power to fuel the rise.  But he has also instructed Mr. Bull to not allow those same investors to complete the journey themselves, he wants to reach the top without them.  It’s a hard job to pull off and Mr Bull needs to use every trick in the book to throw off these investors after they use their money to power the trend upward.  It’s a process that takes time and Mr. Bull’s prime tools are greed and fear in the minds of investors.
As the world’s reserve currency, the dollar can often dictate the direction of commodity prices. When the value of the dollar drops against other currencies, it takes more dollars to purchase commodities than it does when the price is high. Put another way, sellers of commodities get fewer dollars for their product when the dollar is strong and more dollars when the currency is weak. Factors such as weak employment or GDP numbers in the United States can weaken the dollar and lead to higher commodity prices, while strong economic numbers can weaken commodity prices.

Should you need even more proof that you don't need to dive in and out of the stock market every time some new concern emerges, take a look at the historic performance of the S&P 500 since 1950. Despite undergoing 36 stock market corrections over that time -- i.e., at least a 10% loss from a recent high, when rounded -- all but one correction (the current one) has been completely erased by bull market rallies, according to data from Yardeni Research. Erasing stock market declines often happens within a matter of weeks or months, leaving those skeptics who ran to the sidelines eating the markets' dust more times than not.
Precious metals expert Michael Ballanger discusses the recent rise in precious metals prices and what he sees ahead for the metals. As many of us have grown to appreciate over the years, forecasts tend to be nothing more than "educated guesses" and no matter what methods one uses, predicting directional and amplitudinal movements in economics or finance or asset prices is analogous to standing in the paddock at Woodbine racetrack with a copy of the racing forum and a cup of black coffee, trying to determine whether Stormy's Revenge or Gluewagon is going to take the fifth in the mud. I spend literally hours upon hours drawing lines on charts and reading other people's forecasts in a desperate attempt to handicap the next $50 move in gold and I must confess that even without the nausea brought about by countless interventions and manipulations, it is an extremely difficult exercise.
However, this model has inherent problems since stocks carry more risk and are more volatile than government bonds. For example, future earnings forecasts may rise or fall in equity markets, which can positively or adversely affect your investment. What if the 12-month earnings predictions are dreadful as the economy is forecasted to go into a recession? The traditional Fed Model would not account for this future performance and therefore may inaccurately suggest to investors that stocks represent a better option than bonds.
I re-ran the simulation and accounted for transaction fees of $20 per trade. I also factored in slippage of 0.50% because buying large positions over a short period of time will drive prices up and cause slippage. This resulted in a 5-year annualized return of 18.9% with a max drawdown of 38.4%, and 45% of the trades were winners. But perhaps most importantly, there was a massive turnover of stocks to the tune of 400% per year, which would result in hefty fees and require a significant time investment.

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